Literature & Poetry

A unique manuscript, author's copy by Niyazi Dede, the Sheikh of the Mevlevi Monastery in Salonika, written in 1260 H. [1844 AD]

Manuscript in Ottoman Turkish
154 pages, 21 x 13 cm.
Cardboard cover with leather spine.

Two other small works are included in the manuscript: 1. A complete copy of Dîvânçe (Little Divan of 28 poems) by La'lî Mehmed Fenâî Efendi (998 - 1112 H / 1590 - 1700 AD) Only 4 copies are known in Istanbul libraries. 2. A commentary on Tahḏīb al-āṯā (The Summary of the Hadith of the Prophet) by Abū Ǧaʿfar Muḥammad b. Ǧarīr aṭ-Ṭabarī; (839 - 923 H. /1435 - 1517 AD). Occultism (from Latin occultus 'hidden', 'concealed', 'secret') is a vague collective term for a wide variety of phenomena, practices and ...

Kitab-ı Viranî Baba

Manuscript in Ottoman Turkish, copyist unknown, written 1217 H [1802 AD].
70 pages, 20 x 12 cm.
Marbled cardboard cover with leather spine.

Viranî Baba, an important figure of the Bektashi order, is considered one of the seven great poets of Sufism. He is a mystical poet who deals with the Bektashi teachings in his works. "Kitab-ı Viranî Baba" is one of Virani's most important works. It deals with topics such as religious and moral advice, the Prophet Muhammad, His Holiness Ali, the Twelve Imams and the love of Ahl al-Bayt. Hurufism is a belief system that assigns new meanings to numbers and letters. Many sources indicate that it has influenced Bektash...

Kitāb al-Tawḍīḥ fī Ḥall Ghawāmiḍ al-Tanqīḥ [wa huwa Sharḥ al-Tanqīḥ] (Book of Elucidation on Solving the Ambiguities of the Revision [and this is the commentary on Tanqīḥ al-uṣūl by the same author])

Manuscript in Arabic
Copied by Muhammed el Hac Ilyas in Mahrusa [Istanbul], 867 [1462]
212 pp., 27 x 18 cm
unbound with remnants of original leather cover

Sadr al-Shari'a, a Bukharan Hanafi theologian and jurist who lived in Bukhara and Herat in the post-Mongol period, attempted to synthesize the prevalent Ash'ari theological tradition with the Central Asian Hanafi juristic tradition. He focused in particular on the Hanafi Usul work of al-Pazdawi (d. 1089), on the one hand, and the two most influential theological works of the period, the al-Mukhtasar (The Abbreviated) of lbn al-Hajib (d. 1249) and al-Mahsul (The Harvest) of al-Razi, on the other. Many commentaries were writte...

The Complete Works

Manuscripts and Printed Parts in Ottoman Turkish.
Bound in one volume:
1. Dibace/preface, manuscript, 2 pp.
2. Silsila, manuscript, 1 p.
3. Divân-ı Seyyid Nigâri Be-Zeban-ı Türkî and Çaynâme, Istanbul 1302 [1886], Süleyman Efendi Matbaası 366 pp. (with handwritten additions of parts not printed)
4. Nigarnâme, manuscript, author’s copy, 187 pp.
5. Menâkıb-ı Seyyid Nigârî, manuscript, 10 pp.

Mir Hamza Nigari is the most famous mystic in Anatolia and Caucasia in the 19th century. Nigari was born in the town of Zengezur in the Caucasian region of Karaba and received his primary education there. While still young, he moved to Anatolia and joined the smail irvani sect in Amasya. Nigari, who taught mystical principles in Istanbul, Erzurum and Harput, died in Harput and is buried in Amasya. ad 2: Silsila in Sufism is the spiritual chain of a sheikh that connects him to the Prophet Muhammad through previous generations...

Anqāʾ Meşrık (The Griffin of the East)

Manuscript in Ottoman Turkish
Copied by Zeynel Abidin Pur Taksir, 1227 [1812]
28 leaves,
17.5 x 12 cm.

Mustafa Haşim Baba whose pseudonym was "Hâşimî" in his poems, was born in Üsküdar, İstanbul in 1130 [1718]. He was the son of the Yusuf Nizâmeddin Efendi , Sheikh of Bandırmalızade Tekkesi (Dervish lodge). Haşim Baba was educated according to the practices of Jalwatiyya orders, after that he inclinated to Bektashism orders and even he was appointed to the post of Dedebabalık. However, neither the Jalwatis nor the Bektashis had accepted him. He died in 1197 [1718]. After his death, the Hasimiyyas, which was establi...

Tuhfetü’l-Haremeyn (On Pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina)

Manuscript in Ottoman Turkish.
Due to chronogram written in 1093 [1683]
No name of a copist mentioned, possibly written by Nabi himself.
328 pp., 23 x 16 cm.

Nâbi, actually Yūsuf Nābī; born 1642 in Şanlıurfa (Ruhā); died 10 April 1712 in Istanbul; was an Ottoman poet of the 17th /18th century and one of the dominant poet personalities of his time. Nâbi belongs to the group of Dīwān poets. In a total of ten works, four of which are in prose, he takes a critical look at the social reality of his time. A collection of poems in Persian is considered lost. He compiled a dīwān of his early poems in Istanbul. During his time in Aleppo, a second dīwān was created at the request of the go...

Makâmât’ül Evliyâ, Silsilename, Risale Akşemseddin

Three Manuscripts in Ottoman Turkish
Copied by Seyyid İbrahim Şevki
5 Cemazielevvel 1273 [1. January 1857]
Bound in one volume.
27 pp., 20 x 13.5 cm.

Three manuscripts bound in one: 1. Makâmât’ül Evliyâ, a prominent work of Akşemseddin, master of the conquerer of stanbul, Fatih Sultan Mehmet. Makâmât’ül Evliyâ is a work that contains most of Akşemseddin ’s thoughts about Islamic mysticism (sufizm) and is about seventeen ranks (maqam) of Saints. 2. Silsilename 3. Risale Akşemseddin Copied by Seyyid Ibrahim Şevki 5 Cemazielevvel 1273 [1. Janury 1857] Muḥammad Aq Shams al-Dīn, or Aq Şemseddīn (modern Turkish Akşemseddin), was born in Damascus. His father, Shaykh Ḥa...